Can you give me some fun science experiments I could do with my...?

Question:kindergartner this year?

Answers:
A great one is always to add baking soda to vinegar. You can add food coloring, put a cone over it and call it a volcano. My personal favorite is to show the vascular system of plants-get a white flower,trim the bottom off the stem and stick it in a food coloring solution. That is how you can dye flowers; it's really neat.
How about getting bottles of soda and dropping candies in them till they become soda fountains?
http://www.funology.com/laboratory/index...
hope it helps..
try yoga game.
go to the library and find books on easy science experiments. They have TONS!
Some of my favorites:
blowing up a diet coke two liter with mentos (outside, lol)
balancing a stack of heavy books on empty egshells (they can hold a lot of weight)
poking a wooden skewer through a blown up balloon (guaranteed to amaze)
The best part is telling them why each of these things happens.
There are also fun kitchen experiments like "scared pepper" (float pepper on water, put a little soap on your finger, then very dramatically say something scary, yet funny as you dip your finger in the water and the pepper will "run away")

gosh, I love elementary aged science experiments!

PS don't forget. "even if it doesn't work, it is still science" My "students" had that phrase memorized! LOL
For a Kindergarten student, I would think that some experiments would be a little advanced so keeping it simple would be important.. Cause and Effect, What happens if we do this? Focus on moving items with air (such as pushing a car with a turkey baster, straw or a balloon. Experiments using the five senses?
http://www.sedl.org/scimath/pasopartners...

Something as simple as creating collections of leaves, bark, pictures of trees, categorizing items.

Here are a couple of other sites with ideas:
http://hastings.lexingtonma.org/staff/sl...
http://www.scholastic.com/schoolage/kind...
Try Robert Krampf's science experiment of the week:

http://krampf.com/news.html

There are tons of science experiment books at the library.
I recommend the book "1-2-3 Science", You should be able to find it at your library. Its great!
A few great books to look for in the library:

_Mudpies to Magnets_ and _More Mudpies to Magnets_ by Robert A. Williams, et. al.

_Bubbles, Rainbows, and Worms_ by Sam Ed Brown

Any of the _ (_________) for Every Kid_ books (Earth Science, Human Body, etc.) by Janice VanCleave.

_Adventures with Atoms and Molecules_ (any volume) by Mebane and Rybolt. These are generally for older elementary, but I'm sure a K'er will enjoy the reactions and such.

Any of the _Usborne Book of Science Activities_ (vol. 1, 2, or 3). Usborne has several series of science books - you might want to look at their whole "catalog".

_Developing Critical Thinking Through Science_ from Critical Thinking Company (recommended by Dr, Jay Wile, founder of Apologia)

Also, go to Rainbow Resource and browse through what they have in science. I'm sure you'll find plenty to keep you occupied!
I saw something on childrens tv where they dropped raisins into a bottle of carbonated water and the raisins kept going up and down.
One my daughter loves is when we make a channel system with mud. We use sharp builders sand and water to make the mud. She loves watching the water flow down the channels.
Yea! Kinder! They love bugs! I would go to home depot or other garden center and do something with ladybugs and hand held microscopes! They sell them for less than a dollar! You could read a book about insects(ladybg books are easy to find! and make ladybugs out of construction paper and other art supplys!while drawing attention to the parts.
I worked in a science center, and kindergarteners were among my favorite visitors. A few favorite experiments:

- Ooblek: goop made from corn starch + water. Interesting properties when squeezed.
- Light, color, and shadow: flashlights + anything tinted w/color and translucent + different things that cast shadows. Open-ended play to discover how colors mix to form other colors, as well as how translucent vs. opaque objects work with a flashlight.
- Cabbage juice. Boil purple cabbage until the water is deep blue/purple (and smelly!). Remove leaves and let juice cool. Pour juice into small containers (trimmed-down paper cups, for example). With eyedropper, add vinegar and/or baking soda. Cabbage juice changes color; vinegar reacts fizzily to baking soda.
- Bubbles. Have all kinds of different "wands" available, including various (non-sharp) kitchen utensils.
- A strong magnifying glass and pond water. Lots of little squirmy things to look at!

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