Can the school still place your child in a special class? If you tell them no!?



Answers:
No they can not. You and the staff at the school should develop an IEP to meet the needs of your child.
I would think not. However the educators are in the business of assessing the best place for your child and have the benefit of experience with many children in making that choice. I would give it a long hard thought before deciding you know better. You should acknowledge that it might be hard for you to keep objectivity with your own child. Whatever happens, I hope it turns out well for him/her, good luck.
No they can not. Did the school do a full educational evaluation on your child to determine that he qualifies for this class? If they did, did you give written permission for them to do this eval?

There is a specific process that the school must follow before they put a child in special ed. They can NOT just 'put him there'.

If they did or did not do an evaluation, write to whoever wants to do this and state that you disagree with this because the school did not follow the federal special ed laws 'IDEA' and they are in violation of these laws.

In this letter also request 'prior written notice' for their decision to do this. It is required by law for them to give you a written LEGAL reason for their decision.

And they do NOT have a LEGAL reason for doing this if they did NOT follow the legal process.

Asking for this prior written notice will also make them back up and drop the whole thing.

Just watch, they will back up mighty quick.

Please email me at sisymay@yahoo.com for more help !!
It depends on what is going on. Make sure that you have a meeting with your childs teacher, administrator,school psychologist and social worker and anyone else involved with your child at school. Have your child tested in areas where you think he is not performing well. Then, if needed, get together with the list above and work on IEP goals for your child that should be utilized by all teachers involved. Make sure to go to all meetings with/about your child and keep in daily contact with the teachers.
No, there are different steps that you have to take though. Talk to a special education person at your child school that works with all of the IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) stuff. You could try to read IDEA, it is probably available at your local library, but I will warn you, it is a tough read if you don't have a background in special ed.
No, not legally and not according to policy
NO.

You can take the school to a due process hearing. Most districts will refuse, as that can be very expensive.

However, please understand one thing, if your child has a significant disability a typical classroom may not be appropriate. While I do not know your situation, I have seen so many children struggle and fail in a typical classroom because their parents would not permit them to be in a special classroom. Some children need to have their core classes(math, reading and such) in a smaller setting so that they can actually learn and retain the information. Being placed in a classroom for math/reading does not deny a child the opportunity to make friends and be a kid, but does permit them to learn at a pace that is right for them. As a teacher, I get so tired of the word inclusion...its just not right for everyone.

On the other hand, your home school district may wrong and if they are then threaten to take them due process. As long as you didn't sign a NOREP (notice of recommended educational placement), then they can't make you do anything.
It depends. If you have not signed an IEP, then they cannot change your child's placement without your signature. However, if you have already signed an initial IEP, and your district wants to change his placement, all they have to do is let you know. If you do not put in writing that you contest the new placement, the new placement will be put into effect without your signature.
Not legally, no.

Even if your child is "special", it may be in his best interest not to be in a special education class.

You should ensure the child recieves proper attention, but without knowing his particular disability, or the type of special class, its hard for me to say. At my high school, each child in the special ed class recieved a teacher to help them learn what they needed to, and the children were individually placed in various average classes, which they were given assistance with. Find out before you say 'no', because special ed can help a student if they need it.
I'd rather be placed in a special class than take resource room. When I take resource room, I lose the opportunity to choose an elective. I honestly think special classes are better. At least I don't lose any opportunity to choose. Why would you tell them no if special classes are better? Your child can choose more electives. If your child takes resource room, he loses an opportunity to choose his classes. Your child will still be with his peers. It's not like he is going to a special school. Why would you even say no to the school? Special classes in my opinion are always better for the special needs student. The general education students wouldn't have to be bothered since your child is going to be in a special class. It is better for the child and better for the general education students.
Nope.
Yes because you have the right. It's your child. If the child is 18 then he or she makes that decision. The school's right is only to suggest.

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